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Annotated Bibliography of Colonialism (Change VS Tradition) in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
Alam, Mahbubul. “Reading Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart from the Postcolonial Perspective.” Research on Humanities and Social Sciences (2014).
The article’s author evaluates the different postcolonial discourses that are ranging from cultural, psychological, and political and of course their aftermath. The article showcases areas where Chinua Achebe illustrates cultural traditions in the Igbo community through the indigenous language. As a result, Chinua Achebe decides to use the English language to express his opinions, demonstrating the current colonialism’s impact. The article also further explores how the Englanders moved into the Igbo community and when they could not find a church, they started believing that Igbo people are primitive and illiterate, not knowing that societal rules guide them. That is when colonialists implemented changes in terms of religion, family life, and perceptions regarding death to better the lives of all the Igbo people. The author ensures that he explains the whole misrepresentations of Igbo people in occidental discourse relating to colonialism and why it is necessary to consider embracing a change.
Soin, Ridhima. “A CRITIQUE OF COLONIALISM: ACHEBE’S THINGS FALL APART, NO LONGER AT EASE AND ARROW OF GOD.”
The author explores different types of colonialism expressed in Things Fall Apart and establishes the dichotomy of change versus tradition in this article. The article discusses how some colonialist methods such as a change in religion, education, religion is adopted and changed by colonizers to help subjugate natives. The article critiques the effects of colonialists on Igbo natives as they had to undergo an oppressive period as they implemented changes brought forth by the colonizers. Change is essential as it enables people to rediscover, modify, and reinvent themselves; however, when the natives (1gbo people) suffer under the oppressive colonial rule to save the values and reconstruct the modern African, its effects are not sound. Therefore, the article depicts that change is essential and better than tradition; preserving African traditions is critical for boosting culture and values. 
Kenalemang, Lame Maatla. “Things fall apart: An analysis of pre and post-colonial